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20131028
20131105
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KQED (PBS) 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
minute to protect investors from risky inventions that often fail? steve case co-founded aol and is now ceo of evolution, an investor firm in washington, d.c. he is convinced the law would encourage the creation of more start-ups. >> i think it will unleash a new way of entrepreneurship across the nation. >> reporter: case was on president obama's jobs council and was a major supporter of the jobs act. >> the jobs act will help provide more entrepreneurs in more places and in more sectors of our economy the ability to raise the capital, to get started or to grow their company. >> reporter: arturo says this new law could help him raise money. >> it will allow us to focus on growth much faster and not have to deal with the standard angel funding ventures we would have to go on. >> reporter: is this also going to create more jobs? >> absolutely. if we want to get our economic growth up, the place to start is start-ups. to make sure we're competitive, the focus is start-ups. >> reporter: according to the bureau of labor statistics, each year since 1994, start-ups gained more of all u.s. bus
days a week for years. >> rose: it is well-known that david kelly and steve jobs were very very good friends and they both were living with cancer. for "60 minutes" i did a prefile of david and ido the school i mentioned earlier. here's a clip from that. here it is. >> he came over and said look, don't consider any alternative, go straight to western medicine, don't try any herbs or anything. why do you think he said don't look for alternative medicine go straight to the hard stuff. >> i think in his mind he had made the mistake that he had tried to cure his pancreatic cancer in other ways other than, i mean he just said don't mess around. when we both had cancer at the same time is when i got really close to him. and i was at home like sitting around in my skivvys waiting the for my next dose of something. this was the day after the iphone was a announced and he had one for me. it was a lovely feeling. so he decides to hook it up for me so he gets on the phone to at&t and peace going -- he's going to hook up my phone and it's not going well. eventually he pulls the i'm steve jobs c
apple under steve jobs. the boss wants to see results. it is also why amazon is so successful today and will be the first retailer to get to $100 billion in sales. he demands the best from everybody. >> from the book, it does not sound like you like jeff bezos very much. >> that is not true. i think you have to respect someone who starts in a garage 19 years ago and built a remarkable company that has changed not just the way we shop, but the way we read. of course, i have criticisms, and i dare -- and i say that against amazon, that it is ruthless in some markets. it has pushed publishers and booksellers into uncomfortable spaces, but that may be the cost of doing business in a fast internet age. we saw other companies that started doing business with amazon that have not innovated in the same way, like aol, and they are in trouble. i'm not making any judgments, but it really is a remarkable story. >> it is a remark will story. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> tonight, paris closed doors on one of its most popular galleries and the work to demolish it is underway. it is
had, like, doubled our money. we had, like, $400,000, almost $500,000. >> smith: steve schullo and dan robertson believed they were headed for early retirement the day their portfolio topped $1 million. it was november 11, 1999. >> oh, that was a very nice day, that day, wasn't it? >> what happened november 11? >> see, he doesn't... it's when our portfolio went over a million, silly. >> oh! >> that was just amazing. it was like, "well, yeah, this is how investments work. you invest it and it grows." i mean, that's how i thought about it. >> it was a manic monday in the financial markets... >> stocks plunged... >> traders are standing there, watching in amazement and i don't blame them... >> smith: but in the spring of 2000, the market collapsed. >> traders are working the phones today. a lot of their customers are freaked out... >> we did not know. this was our mistake. we didn't know it was a bubble. we just didn't know. our portfolio had gone all the way down to where it was in 1996, from $1.5 million to $500,000. >> $460,000, i think. >> all that was gone. >> smith: at the height of
page or steve jobs. he has high standards. the fact that he pushes everyone around him to operate at their best. >> rose: dick cheney, dr. jonathan reiner and brad stone when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> an enemy that operates in the shadows and views the entire world as a battle field is not one that can be contained or deterred. an enemy with fantasies martyrdom. >> rose: he was secretary of defense under president george h.w. bush and press of staff to gerald ford. heart disease threatened his life in the course of his political career. he suffered five heart attacks the first at the age of 37. reconciled himself to dying three years ago when he was at end stage heart failure. a heart transplant in 2012 saved his life. he talks about his experiences for the first time in the new book, it is called heart, an american medical odyssey. he wrote it with the cardiologist dr. jonathan reiner who will be joining us later. i'm please to do have dick cheney back on this program. welcome. >> thank y
phone 4 in june of 2010? >> we're having a little problem here. >> steve jobs couldn't get it to connect to the internet. embarrassing, but they worked it out. when facebook went public last year a technical error in nasdaq's system delayed the start of trading resulting in a loss to market makers of half a billion dollars. and those of you old enough to know who rube goldberg was may recall the rollout of the edsel, a ford motor company automobile so awful its name still is synonymous with a costly flop. and let's not talk about lehman brothers, bear stearns, aig, jpmorgan chase. the crash of '08. beside those calamities, obamacare's computer problems pale. oh, yes, mistakes are made by big corporations and big government. and although i was for something else, something simpler and easier to manage, i'm betting this will get fixed. as for those strident partisan voices crowing over obama care's first bad round, ask yourself if those weren't some of the same voices cheering on the invasion of iraq and promising victory would be swift and easy. ten years. trillions of dollars. and all th
was at the press conference today and joins me now. both steve cohen were engaging in wrongdoing didn't have the evidence they needed. settlement of the charges against the company does not create any sort of immunity for cohen himself or any individuax3 and i think the u.s. attorney, he might have mentioned that four different times during a 40 minute press conference. so they are still looking into him. there is also a civil case with the sec which also could carry a significant bite. the sec is looking to bar stephen cohen from the securities industry for life. this is almost a harshest penalty the sec can dish out to anyone. that has yet to be resolved. that is likely to be a major blow for someone who thought of himself and was widely seen as the greatest trade never his generation. >> sheelah kolhatkar of business week, thanks very much. >> egypt's first democratically elected president now on trial for >> ifill: egypt's first democratically elected president, now on trial for inciting murder was defiant during his brief first day in court. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins ou
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)